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Tommy Heinsohn never gets his due respect

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Isn't it time to recognize Tommy Heinsohn as a true Boston treasure? After starring at Holy Cross, Red Auerbach drafted him in 1956 with the Celtics' territorial pick, while also finagling a trade with the St. Louis Hawks to acquire Bill Russell. K. C. Jones and future Celtic, Willie Naulls (drafted by Hawks), were taken in the second round. Red was unmerciful with Heinsohn from the start, constantly berating him in front of the troops and bestowing on him the demeaning task of lugging the ball bag - not only in Tommy's rookie year but also in his sophomore season. The following from my interview with Sam Jones:

(Sam): "I saw a lot of it. I loved it. That means he (Red) kept off my back. That (Heinsohn) was Red's whipping boy. Better Tommy than me."

Tommy had a spectacular rookie season, putting up 16.2 PPG and hauling down 9.9 rebounds in 29.9 minutes per contest. His minutes increased to 37.0 MPG in the post-season, as did his points (22.9 PPG) and boards (1…

Marcus Smart victim of bias in DPOY voting

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Don't expect Celtics guard, Marcus Smart, to seriously compete for the NBA Defensive-Player-of-the-Year Award this season. He has too much against him in the form of bias from several sources. Defensive guards stand little chance to walk away with this trophy, but that has not always been the case.

The DPOY Award has been given out since the 1982-83 season, and five of the six initial winners played the guard position:

1983: Sidney Moncrief (guard)
1984: Sidney Moncrief (guard)
1985: Mark Eaton (center)
1986: Alvin Robertson (guard)
1987: Michael Cooper (guard/forward)
1988: Michael Jordan (guard)


It has been all centers (23) and forwards(7), with the one exception being Gary Payton (guard) winning the trophy in 1996. The numbers clearly show why Smart stands little chance of ever seeing the DPOY Trophy in his home.

So where does the bias come in. Well, first of all, there is obvious prejudice here directed at the "little guy". While other NBA awards such as MVP and MIP …

A vote of confidence in Daniel Theis as starting center

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Results of my Twitter poll concerned with the Celtics present position at the 5-spot are in, and they can be seen below. The likable Enes Kanter didn't get much love from fans this time, garnering no votes to start in the pivot.

Does Theis suffice at the center spot?
Daniel has been Brad Stevens' top choice in the pivot, and that may not change soon. What are your thoughts for next season?— Tom Lane (@CelticsSentinel) June 12, 2020
Daniel set career highs in 58 games thus far this season in:

Minutes:23.8
Points: 9.3
Rebounds: 6.6
Assists: 1.6
Steals: 0.6
Blocks: 1.3
FG%: 56.5
FT%: 76.4
Damn fine stats considering he plays slightly less than half the game. What more does this man have to do to be taken seriously? And at the age of 28 years, he may not have reached his peak. He just keeps improving.

Past/Present Pairings: Marcus Smart and Dave Cowens

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Just image a fantasy pairing of Marcus Smart and Dave Cowens. One is black. The other white. Marcus has played all five positions but is listed as a guard. Many thought Dave was destined as a power forward, but he played center for the Boston Celtics. The differences in the Potent Pair generally end there.

Call them "Horizontal Heroes" or strong contenders for the "NBA Floor Burn Trophy", but they both are known for their ferocious defense and the will to never take a play off. They display what Miami Coach Erik Spoelstra once termed "primal energy" when he beseeched his team to go after loose balls versus Dirk Nowitski's Mavericks. Here is Marcus Smart hitting the floor:

Favourite play of the NBA season so far? pic.twitter.com/zM7SIfkFOn— Josh Coyne (@poundcoyne) June 6, 2020
Dave Cowens was not just quick for a big man. He was quick, period. Watch how he switches onto Oscar Robertson, knocks the ball loose from the legendary guard and outraces him to…

Bill Russell needs to be the image on the new NBA logo

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Having already proposed the renaming of Christopher Columbus Park in Boston after Celtics-Great, Bill Russell, I will once again advocate strongly for the NBA logo to bear his likeness.

Folks responding to @Advil & @CelticsSentinel plea to have Christopher Columbus Park named after Bill Russell.
The time is right, and that time is NOW! @FCHWPOhttps://t.co/7sWY7KVFoLpic.twitter.com/8loOA0s2Re— Tom Lane (@CelticsSentinel) June 3, 2020
Jerry West has been the image on the League's logo since 1969. The designer was Alan Siegel, and apparently Siegel had a reason for his choice (per sportscasting.com's Rick Thomas):

The image of West was chosen as the basis of the NBA logo because Siegel felt it best embodied the league’s dynamism and athleticism. The silhouette manages to convey power, movement, and grace all at once
West never made any money from his image representing the NBA, and he seems to have no strong feelings about remaining as the visual representation of the League.

If They Played Today - Bill Russell

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Former-Celtics great, Bill Russell, walked around with a chip on his shoulder, but he also played basketball with that same attitude. Russ has mellowed over the years, but the chip remains in place for anyone attempting to knock it off. Could he play - or even be a star these days? Here's my analysis.

Who am I to judge?I lived down the street from Russell in Reading, Massachusetts during the 1960's and started following the NBA at the same time. Bill's second home in Reading was more upscale and private than his first residence on busy Main Street. A line of cedar trees all-but-shielded the Haverhill Street home from view. It was "Big Bill's" (as Johnny Most called him) play on the court that largely fueled my interest in the Boston Celtics, all the way to his final game, and triumph, when he led his team to its 11th Championship on May 5, 1969 versus the Los Angeles Lakers.

As Jim Murray, the late Pulitzer Prize-winning sports writer of the Los Angeles Times w…

Celtics most-despised opponent: Pistons Bill Laimbeer

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It is no contest. In the vote count for the most-despised Celtics opponent of all time, Bill Laimbeer of the Detroit Pistons takes first place, and no runner-ups are even close. Bill's the winner in this race. Laimbeer wouldn't just annoy and antagonize, he would whip opposing players into an absolute frenzy. Bill's takedown of Larry Bird in Game Three of the 1987 Eastern Conference Finals earned him a $5,000 fine. Larry was fined $2,000 for retaliating. Bird was known for his controlled anger, but he lost it in this confrontation - apparently for good reason.

The game Larry Bird and Bill Laimbeer went at it. Seeing Larry Legend go full berserk is rare. You have to take him to the limit to see that.
FULL VID https://t.co/CgVt6hvPgnpic.twitter.com/kg6BPguWCb— OLDSKOOLBBALL (@Oldskoolbball1) April 11, 2020
In Game Five, the normally-mild mannered Celtics center, Robert Parish, got so angry at Laimbeer that he golfed him three times in plain view of three officials, none of wh…