How did Green Giant, Tacko Fall, go undrafted?

The short answer to the above question is that NBA General Mangers don't view old-school bigs like they did in Red Auerbach's (or even Danny Ainge's) day. A total of 30 GMs bypassed choosing the Green Giant, going instead with the much-sought-after ball handlers and wings. But the buzz around the League now is low-key amazement that Tacko never got taken - that is until Danny Ainge signed him up.

As a former researcher, I know numbers don't lie, but they also don't tell the whole story. Fall made his NBA debut last night - played three minutes - scored four points (2-of-4) - took down three rebounds - and blocked one shot that never got into the stat sheet. Three minutes is a mighty poor sample (0.08% of possible regular season minutes), but there are worth looking at. I already did Rob Williams' per-36-minutes numbers, now lets look at those for Tacko.

36 points - 27 rebounds - 18 fouls


Tacko has the same malady as Rob Williams - being foul prone. That can be cured with time, experience and seasoning. But getting back to the question of not being drafted, it is obvious that the NBA execs out there considered him an extremely-long center that would only score on dunks and put-backs - would get his share of rebounds - and block some shots, the profile of the old-time centers. The only stretch part of his game would be his height. Not good in today's game, right?

After watching him on the floor, that thinking may be changing. I have argued right along that Danny needs to lock the Green Giant in, and he has done just that - signing Fall to a two-way deal. A lot of NBA GMs may end up wishing for a do-over on their picks from the 2019 NBA draft. And Green Giant Foods may want to lock in this Tall Green Leprechaun for commercial purposes before he gets away.

Follow Tom at @CelticsSentinel and Facebook

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